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pawn grabbing is a bad habit
Pawns in hand.

Pawn grabbing is a bad habit.

Whenever there is a tendency to grab pawns in your chess game think again. And here is the reason as to why.

At its heart, chess is a logical game: if your opponent repeatedly violates opening or middle-game principles (usually to attain a small material plus is not a good reason), he or she will have to face the repercussions in due course.

Usually, a player will neglect his development in favor of material gain like a pawn capture, because he sees no immediate tactical refutation. This stems from the fact that he assumes he will find a way to neutralize his opponent’s development initiative in due course.

Carlsen seems to prefer always taking a pawn, as long as there is no obvious loss – but he is not a normal player like us guys in the fishpond!. He even did it in game 5 vs Anand in November 2014.

But chess can be brutal on such acts of trespass. More so when the Queen is involved since Queen’s pawngrabbing adventures can cost valuable time. If you don’t know what you are doing just don’t do it. A point lost can never be regained. Years of hard work will be at risk if you are a professional player.

Have a look below.

Rozentalis – Minak 
2008

This position arose after some moves in the Sicilian Rossolimo Variation. Black just grabbed a pawn at h4.

I request you to analyze this position and post your ideas, plans and suggestions in the comments area below.
For answer you have to see the video. Your ideas and plans are also welcome.
 


In closing remember that modern chess is not dogmatic; the rules are not written in stone. There are genuine cases when pawn grabbing is tactically justified (the Poisoned Pawn Variation of the Najdorf Defense comes to my mind).

But in the majority of cases it is wrong, and whenever your opponent does engage in such acts punish him or look for ways to do so.

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Four moves in - we are all blind

ALGORITHMS Four Moves In, We Are All Blind

Four yALGORITHMS Four Moves In We Are All Blindears in the making, a unique documentary on young blind chess players from India made by British filmmaker Ian McDonald and an Indian team to screen at the World Chess Championship in Chennai. Titled – ALGORITHMS Four Moves In, We Are All Blind – A Unique Documentary that is worth watching.

A film by Ian McDonald
India | 2012 | HDV | B&W | 96 mins
English, Hindi, Tamil, Odiya with English subtitles

produced by Geetha J.

The award-winning documentary Algorithms, directed by sports sociologist and documentarian Ian McDonald will be screened at the FIDE World Chess Championship 2013.

This one-off special screening presented by FIDE, AICF and TNSCA will be held at 4 pm on 21 Nov, 2013 at the Abbotsbury Ballroom (next to Media Centre), Hotel Hyatt Regency, the venue of the championship. Director Ian McDonald and Geetha J, the producer of the film will be present for the screening.

Algorithms (2012 / 96mins) is a feature documentary on young blind chess players from India. Filmed over three years from just before the World Junior Blind Chess Championship in Sweden in 2009 to just after the next championship in Greece in 2011, it follows three talented boys from different parts of India and a totally blind player turned pioneer who not only aims to situate India on a global stage but also wants all blind children to play chess.

The film, which has received critical acclaim and picked up awards at film festivals all over the world, is Ian’s first feature documentary and the first ever feature documentary on blind chess. Ian, who recently joined Newcastle University, UK, as a Lecturer in Film Practice, commented:

“The response to Algorithms has been amazing wherever it has screened. Audiences have been really taken with the subject matter, but most of all, it is the compelling characters in the film that seem to have captivated people. I am really looking forward to seeing what the audience in this chess championship make of the extraordinary young blind chess players of India!”

Screening is free to all but donations are welcome as all proceeds will go towards creating a high spec “Audio Narration” to make the film accessible to the blind and visually impaired community.

[button url=’#’ size=’small’ style=’coral’] About the Film: [/button]

In India, a group of boys dream of becoming Chess Masters, driven by a man with a vision. But this is no ordinary chess and these are no ordinary players. Algorithms is a documentary on the thriving but little known world of Blind Chess in India.

Filmed over three years from just before the World Junior Blind Chess Championship in Sweden in 2009 to just after the next championship in Greece in 2011, it follows three talented boys from different parts of India and a totally blind player turned pioneer who not only aims to situate India on a global stage but also wants all blind children to play chess.

Algorithms travels with the chess players to competitive tournaments and visits them in their home milieu where they reveal their struggles, anxieties and hopes. It moves through the algorithms of the blind chess world reminding the sighted of what it means to see. Going beyond sight and story, this observational sport doc with a difference elicits hidden realms of subjectivity. It allows for the tactile and thoughtful journey that explores foresight, sight and vision to continue long after the moving image ends.

Algorithms is the first ever feature documentary on Blind Chess.

[button url=’#’ size=’small’ style=’royal-blue’] THE CHESS PLAYERS:[/button]

charudatta Charudatta Jadhav from Mumbai is a champion player turned pioneer. He discovered the game of chess soon after he went blind in his teenage years. It gave him confidence and a purpose in life.  Convinced of the power of this game, he has dedicated his life to develop chess for the blind. A highly successful IT professional, Charu is a man of great drive and ambition, and he aims to situate India in  the top five countries for Blind Chess.

 

 

darpan Darpan Inani from Baroda is the most talented and highest ranked totally blind player in India. This idiosyncratic, confident and highly intelligent teenager is focussed on what he wants to achieve in  chess, and in life. Darpan possesses a wisdom that belies his young age. He is a topper in his sighted school and wants to be the first blind entrepreneur of India.

 

 

 

saikrishnaSaiKrishna S.T. from Chennai is the ambitious rising star of blind chess in India. He is fun-loving, gregarious and makes friends easily. But as a partially sighted boy faced with the possibility of going totally blind, there is a lot more steel to Sai’s character than at first appears. Sai studies in a blind school and is again a topper. He wants to be the first blind journalist of India.

 

 

 

AnantAnant Kumar Nayak from Bhubaneshwar is a promising new talent. He is a gentle boy with an endearing if slightly eccentric personality. With a strong sense of moral duty and responsibility, the totally blind Anant struggles to balance his commitment to chess and studies. Anant has come second in training exams for IAS and hopes to be a rare blind IAS officer of India.

 

[button url=’#’ size=’small’ style=’green’] Contact for film:[/button]

Ian McDonald
0044 7828637358
ian.interventions@gmail.com, info@algorithmsthedocumentary.com

Geetha J / AkamPuram:
0091 9447744864
geetha@akampuram.net, info@akampuram.net

Website:
www.algorithmsthedocumentary.com

This game is not the Game of the Century..

This was played in New York, USA.

Bobby Fischer vs Robert Byrne Manhattan Blitz 1971 1-0

Rate & Thumbs up the video!!

 

In the ongoing 4th Chennai Open GM Chess Tournament. Me & my friends had a nice chat with GM Henrik Danielsen. He was discussing about his training, about his students, and gave his website www.trainlikeagrandmaster.com. In his training method, he doesn’t particularly guide a student but makes a video and sends to his students mail box (Not for free, Of Course).

GM Danielsen pays special attention to the mistakes, categorizing them into inaccuracies, mistakes, and blunders.

I am playing in the tournament and hope to increase some elo points. I will post some of my interesting games, if any.

You can see live games in www.monroi.com.

White has many variations in the Closed Sicilian. He can play a late f4 with Grand Prix-like play, fianchetto the bishop on g3 to get into a Reti opening structure or even play a closed Guioco Piano, etc. You must look at all possible options and make sure you find decent moves corresponding to your chosen move order.

 

To help you (and myself!)I have discussed about the Closed Sicilian from White’s point of view. I have explained the key ideas and major plans for white in the videos. Have a look at the following videos and give your feedback.

 

Some optional resources in Amazon to check out this Closed Sicilian Opening in Chess

BookdepositorySome optional Books from the BookDepository


Usually though, apart from the Gand Prix which can be quite violent if black allows White to launch a King side attack, white doesn’t achieve much unless he opens the center.


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